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Yakima, WA 98902
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Posts for tag: nutrition

By Reep Family Dental
October 24, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: nutrition  

Most of us are aware of the food and drinks we need to avoid in order to prevent common dental issues like tooth stains and nutritiondiscoloration, cavities, and gum disease. And while preventing problems that can cause serious damage is one of the most important aspects of an oral hygiene and dental care routine, our teeth and gums (like the rest of the body) also need essential nutrients in order to stay strong and look their best.

Dental Care and Gum Disease Prevention in Yakima, WA

Dr. Nic Reep, a dentist at Yakima, WA based Reep Family Dental & Dental Sleep Solutions, advises patients to think of their diet as an extension of an overall health and wellness plan that includes the teeth and gums. In addition to daily brushing and flossing, dental check ups, and professional cleanings, the food we eat is one of the most effective tools in either boosting or harming our oral health.

Dentist Approved Foods for Healthy Teeth and Gums

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), our teeth and gums are usually the first to suffer the effects of a poor diet lacking in essential nutrients and vitamins. Along with avoiding over-consumption of processed foods with excessive added sugar, dentists advise eating foods that contribute to dental health, such as:

  • Milk, cheese, yogurt (calcium)
  • Nuts (almonds are high in calcium, protein, and good fats - without the added sugar)
  • Greens - although leafy greens like spinach and kale may not be the first to come to mind when thinking about dental health, they are rich in a number of essential nutrients such as calcium (which helps to protect tooth enamel), folic acid, and vitamin B, all of which also promote general health for the whole body.
  • Crunchy fruits and vegetables - like apples, celery, and carrots - help to scrape excess food particles from the surface of the teeth, and promote saliva production, which helps to flush out cavity and gum disease causing bacteria after every meal.

Find a Dentist in Yakima, WA

A healthy diet and good oral hygiene practices, including regular dental checkups and professional cleanings, are the best way to maintain healthy teeth and gums, and prevent tooth decay and gum disease. For more information on the diet and dental care routine that is best for you, contact Reep Family Dental & Dental Sleep Solutions by calling (509)-248-0986 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Reep today.

DietandLifestyleChoicesKeytoDentalHealthDuringCollegeYears

“The Freshman 15” is a popular way of referring to the phenomenon of new college students gaining weight during their freshman year (although the average is less than fifteen pounds). According to research, college students gain weight mainly due to an unhealthy diet and lack of exercise.

If you're experiencing this as a college student, you should also know poor diet and lifestyle choices harm your teeth and gums as well. If you don't want to encounter major dental problems, then you need to make some changes beginning with the same cause for your weight gain: what you eat and drink.

Like the rest of your body, your teeth and gums have the best chance for being healthy when you're eating a balanced, nutritional diet low in added sugar. And it's not just mealtime: constant snacking on sweets not only loads on the calories, it also feeds disease-causing oral bacteria. Sipping on acidic beverages like sodas, sports or energy drinks also increases the levels of acid that can erode tooth enamel.

Some lifestyle habits can also affect oral health. Using tobacco (smoked or smokeless) inhibits your mouth's natural healing properties and makes you more susceptible to dental disease. While it may be cool to get piercings in your lips, cheeks or tongue, the hardware can cause gum recession, chipped teeth and soft tissue cuts susceptible to infection. And unsafe sexual practices increase your risk for contracting the human papilloma virus (HPV16) that's been linked with oral cancer, among other serious health problems.

Last but not least, how you regularly care for your teeth and gums can make the biggest difference of all. You should brush and floss your teeth ideally twice a day to clean away plaque, a thin film of disease-causing bacteria and food particles. And twice-a-year dental cleanings and checkups will round out your prevention efforts against tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease.

Making your own choices is a rite of passage into adulthood. Making good choices for your teeth and gums will help ensure they remain healthy for a long time to come.

If you would like more information on maintaining dental health during the college years, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “10 Health Tips for College Students.”

By Reep Family Dental
March 18, 2014
Category: Oral Health
CatCoras6WaystoKeepKidsOffJunkFood

Junk food and between-meal sweets are a habit for many of us, even though we know it is bad for our bodies and our teeth. As adults, we are responsible for our own choices. As parents, we are also responsible for our children's choices, and for teaching them to choose wisely.

Celebrity Chef Cat Cora offers the following six suggestions for leading children to a healthy lifestyle. Cora is a star of Iron Chef America and author of Cat Cora's Classics with a Twist: Fresh Takes on Favorite Dishes, in which she reveals healthier versions of classic recipes. In her remakes she shows how to cook with a lot of flavor while reducing fat and sugar. Cora has four young sons, so her methods are not just theories — they have been practiced in real life.

1. Remember who's the boss.

“My kids have never had fast food,” Cora said in a recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine. “The parents have a choice to do that or not,” she said. “The kids are not going to the grocery store to shop; the kids are not driving themselves through fast food chains.”

2. Make your rules clear and stick to them.

“Right now my 7-year-old tries to be picky, but it's really about us being consistent as parents,” Cat said. For example, in her household pizza is served only at the weekly pizza and movie night. The kids get a healthier version of what they want, so they don't feel deprived. The evening includes air-popped popcorn without butter — and no soda, which is bad for teeth because of its sugar and other chemical ingredients.

3. Offer your children a variety of foods and tastes.

Cora made sure her children tried different foods and spices from infancy, so they are open to trying new things. It's easier to get all the nutrition you need if you eat a wide variety of foods.

4. Learn to make tasty substitutions for sugar.

When her children were babies, Cora stopped relying on bottles and sippy cups as soon as possible, reducing her children's likelihood of developing tooth decay due to sugary residues remaining in their mouths. Now that they are older, she uses tasty substitutes for sugar such as fruit purees and the natural sugar substitute Stevia.

5. Include the children in meal planning.

Kids are more likely to eat a meal they are involved in planning and cooking. For example, ask them which vegetable they would like to have (not whether they want to have a vegetable).

6. Model healthy behavior for your kids.

Parents are the best role models. This is true not only for food choices, but also for exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about oral health. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cat Cora.”