Yakima, WA Dentist
Reep Family Dental
3804 Kern Road Suite A
Yakima, WA 98902
(509) 388-0331

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Posts for: March, 2014

By Reep Family Dental
March 18, 2014
Category: Oral Health
CatCoras6WaystoKeepKidsOffJunkFood

Junk food and between-meal sweets are a habit for many of us, even though we know it is bad for our bodies and our teeth. As adults, we are responsible for our own choices. As parents, we are also responsible for our children's choices, and for teaching them to choose wisely.

Celebrity Chef Cat Cora offers the following six suggestions for leading children to a healthy lifestyle. Cora is a star of Iron Chef America and author of Cat Cora's Classics with a Twist: Fresh Takes on Favorite Dishes, in which she reveals healthier versions of classic recipes. In her remakes she shows how to cook with a lot of flavor while reducing fat and sugar. Cora has four young sons, so her methods are not just theories — they have been practiced in real life.

1. Remember who's the boss.

“My kids have never had fast food,” Cora said in a recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine. “The parents have a choice to do that or not,” she said. “The kids are not going to the grocery store to shop; the kids are not driving themselves through fast food chains.”

2. Make your rules clear and stick to them.

“Right now my 7-year-old tries to be picky, but it's really about us being consistent as parents,” Cat said. For example, in her household pizza is served only at the weekly pizza and movie night. The kids get a healthier version of what they want, so they don't feel deprived. The evening includes air-popped popcorn without butter — and no soda, which is bad for teeth because of its sugar and other chemical ingredients.

3. Offer your children a variety of foods and tastes.

Cora made sure her children tried different foods and spices from infancy, so they are open to trying new things. It's easier to get all the nutrition you need if you eat a wide variety of foods.

4. Learn to make tasty substitutions for sugar.

When her children were babies, Cora stopped relying on bottles and sippy cups as soon as possible, reducing her children's likelihood of developing tooth decay due to sugary residues remaining in their mouths. Now that they are older, she uses tasty substitutes for sugar such as fruit purees and the natural sugar substitute Stevia.

5. Include the children in meal planning.

Kids are more likely to eat a meal they are involved in planning and cooking. For example, ask them which vegetable they would like to have (not whether they want to have a vegetable).

6. Model healthy behavior for your kids.

Parents are the best role models. This is true not only for food choices, but also for exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about oral health. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cat Cora.”


By Reep Family Dental
March 05, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Yakima   Veneers  
veneers yakimaAn increasingly popular cosmetic dental procedure, veneers can create a brighter, whiter smile that you have always wanted.  Dental veneers can also give you a perfectly aligned smile that has translucent qualities of ceramic materials to provide a completely natural, redefined look for your teeth.  Today, veneers provide a more natural look than what has previously been available.
 

Dental Veneers Restore Confidence in your Smile

Veneers are custom-designed shells consisting of a tooth-like ceramic material.  When applied over the surface of your tooth, worn enamel and uneven tooth alignment can be covered.  Additionally, other appearance defects can be easily altered.  Today, most veneers are made of porcelain because it resists stains better than any other material and has a light reflecting element that is similar to your natural teeth. 
 
Some problems veneers can commonly fix include:
  • Worn Enamel
  • Wear and Tear
  • Uneven Teeth
  • Accidental Damage
  • Discolored teeth
Veneers are best suited for more severe cases of dullness, wear, discoloration, mild chipping, cracking, spacing, or uneven teeth. For less dramatic dental changes, teeth whitening or bonding may be better options.
 
Typically, at least three dental visits are needed to complete the veneers process, which involves- diagnosis and treatment planning, preparation, and bonding.  To prepare your teeth for veneers, your dentist will lightly buff your teeth to allow for the small-added thickness of the veneer.  About half a millimeter of your tooth will be removed. 
 
An impression of your teeth is taken and sent to a dental lab where your veneers are custom fabricated.  At your next dental visit, your dentist will attach the veneers to your teeth with a special adhesive to keep them in place permanently.  During a two-week period of adjustment that follows your procedure, you may notice a slight change in the size and shape of your teeth. 
 

Veneers Cover-up Unappealing Gaps in your Smile

Not only do veneers add a noticeable whitening effect, but they can cover-up embarrassing gaps in your teeth.  Since veneers have the ability to transform your teeth, gaps are easily covered up and hidden.  Genetics may also play a role in the abnormal spacing between the teeth that continues to grow wider as people age.  With veneers, the genetic spacing can be eliminated and prevented.
 
A consultation with Dr. Nic Reep in Yakima about veneers is always necessary before you decide on the best procedure for whitening and perfecting your smile.  Veneers are not for everyone, but with proper treatment and check-ups, your dentist can decide the best treatments for bringing your smile back to life. 
 
If you are looking to eliminate stains or gaps in your smile, veneers may be the choice for you.  Visit our office for more information.

By Reep Family Dental
March 03, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Top5SymptomsofGumDisease

Do you have gum disease? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, about half of the adults in America have a mild, moderate or severe form of this disease. But if you’re 65 or older, your chance of having it goes up to 70 percent! Periodontal (gum) disease is sometimes called a “silent malady” because major symptoms may not appear until it has reached an advanced stage. How can you recognize the early warning signs? Here are some clues to look for:

  1. Redness and irritation of gums. Having red, swollen or sore gums can be a sign of gum disease; however, it could also result from brushing your teeth too vigorously, or using a brush with hard bristles. That’s why we recommend using a soft-bristled brush and a gentle cleaning stroke. If you’re doing this but you still have irritated gums, it could be an early signal of gum disease.
  2. Bleeding when you brush. Despite what you may think, this is never a normal occurrence. If your gums regularly bleed after brushing, it’s usually an indication that gum disease is present. You should come in for an examination as soon as possible.
  3. Bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth. Bad breath or unpleasant tastes could be caused by what you ate last night — or they could result from gum disease. If the odor or taste is persistent — that is, if it doesn’t seem to go away over time — it could indicate a problem with your gums.
  4. Gum recession. When you have gum recession, the healthy, pink tissue surrounding the teeth begins to pull back, or recede. This exposes more of the tooth’s structure — even its roots — and makes teeth look longer. While gum recession is a common condition that is primarily caused by periodontal disease, many people don’t realize they have it because it occurs so gradually. They also may not realize that by the time it is noticed, some underlying bone tissue has already been lost. Gum recession is a condition you shouldn’t ignore: If left untreated, it can result in the destruction of more gum and bone tissue, and even tooth loss.
  5. Tooth Sensitivity or pain when chewing. Many things can cause tooth pain or sensitivity: an old filling, tooth decay, even a cracked tooth or a root canal problem. Gum disease can also cause this unpleasant sensation. Receding gums may expose the tooth’s roots, which aren’t as well protected from the mouth’s harsh environment as the chewing surfaces; this may cause a sensation of pain when chewing or brushing. If this sensation persists, it’s time for an examination to find out what’s causing it.

Gum disease is a widespread problem — but it’s also very treatable. If you would like more information, call our office to arrange a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Warning Signs of Periodontal (Gum) Disease” and “Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”