Yakima, WA Dentist
Reep Family Dental
3804 Kern Road Suite A
Yakima, WA 98902
(509) 388-0331

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Posts for: December, 2013

By Reep Family Dental
December 30, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gummy smile  
TreatingaGummySmileDependsonitsCause

Something about your smile isn’t quite right. It’s too “gummy” — too much of the upper gum line is visible and it looks out of proportion to your teeth and lips. Most dentists identify a smile as too gummy if four millimeters or more (approximately an eighth of an inch) of the gum tissue is visible at a full smile.

Fortunately, there are ways to minimize this effect. It’s important, though, to first determine the true cause before we embark on any treatment plan.

Your teeth may be the actual cause. As we mature, teeth “erupt” through the gums and the supporting bone and appear in the mouth. They continue to erupt until meeting their “antagonists,” the opposing teeth from the opposite jaw. In addition, the gums go to the proper position where the root meets the enamel of the teeth around late adolescence. The normal result is a length of the crown (the visible portion of the tooth) of approximately 10 mm.

If the teeth don’t erupt fully or the gums don’t go to their proper position, the teeth appear shorter and the gums more prominent. Using a surgical technique called crown lengthening, we remove excess gum tissue and, if necessary, reshape the underlying bone to reveal the proper amount of tooth length. Teeth also shorten due to excessive wear; the teeth continue to erupt to compensate for the wear that occurs over time. The attached gum tissue follows with the tooth. This can be corrected with orthodontic treatment (for bite correction) and porcelain veneers.

Two more causes of a gummy smile are when a person has a hyper-mobile upper lip — the upper lip can raise too much lift when smiling — and an upper jaw length that appears too long for the face. If lips rise higher than the normal 6-8 mm when we smile, too much of the gum line appears. This can be treated temporarily with Botox injections to reduce the mobility of the muscles, or there is a surgical procedure that reduces the mobility of the upper lip. For an elongated upper jaw, orthognathic (“to straighten the jaw”) surgery relocates the jaw to a more upward position that diminishes the amount of gum tissue that shows during smiling.

Treatments for a gummy smile range from simple techniques to more complex surgical procedures. Only a thorough dental exam will reveal the best treatment path to follow.

If you would like more information on treatments for “gummy” smiles, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gummy Smiles.”


By Reep Family Dental
December 27, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
MatthewLewisAdultOrthodontics

If you haven't seen a recent picture of Matthew Lewis, the actor who played Neville Longbottom in all eight Harry Potter movies, you may be in for a surprise: It seems the plump, awkward teenager from Gryffindor has been magically transformed into a post-Hogwarts hunk. What kind of wizardry did it take to change his memorably snarled teeth into a leading man's sparkly smile? The kind skilled cosmetic dentists perform every day!

While special effects created some of the character's dental disarray, the actor's own teeth were far from perfect. And, as Lewis recently noted, the film studio urged him to postpone cosmetic dental work until the movies were all done. “It was something I'd always wanted to do, but it would have meant me wearing a brace for two years,” he told an interviewer with the Yorkshire Evening Post. “Warner Brothers said if I put it off until we'd finished filming they'd pay for it — and they did.”

There are plenty of people, like the twenty-something actor, who put off orthodontic treatment until after their teen years. If you're wondering whether there's still time to get orthodontic work done, then take heart — it's never too late to straighten your teeth!

Today, an estimated twenty percent of orthodontic patients are adults. Compliance with the orthodontic program (meaning thorough regular brushing and flossing, wearing elastics, etc.) is often less of an issue with adults than with teens. Plus, there are some options that can help ensure your orthodontic appliances will fit in with a more mature image.

One is colorless braces. In this system, the brackets (the parts that are bonded to the front teeth and hold the archwire) are made of a clear ceramic material that blends in with the tooth's natural color. This makes them hard to see unless you look closely. Inconspicuous yet effective, clear braces have been the first choice of many celebrities, such as Tom Cruise and Faith Hill... and lots of “regular” adults too.

Another option is lingual braces. These are truly invisible, because they attach behind the teeth (on the tongue side) instead of in front. They work just like the standard braces, and they're appropriate in many situations. However their cost is higher, and the space they occupy in the mouth may take the wearer a bit of time to get used to.

A third option is clear aligners. Unlike braces, which aren't normally removed until orthodontic treatment is nearly complete, clear aligners are easily removable. They consist of a series of transparent trays made of special plastic, which are worn over the teeth 22 hours per day. Each tray in the series is worn for a few weeks, and each moves the teeth a small amount; all together, they can accomplish a big change.

Aligners work well for correcting mild to moderate malocclusion (bite problems). Plus, you can temporarily remove them for important social occasions. But best of all, they're virtually undetectable — so whether or not you play the role of a wizard in the movies, you won't need a magic spell to make them invisible!

Which option is right for you? That's something we would be happy to discuss. If you would like more information about adult orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontics for the Older Adult.”


By Reep Family Dental
December 23, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Root Canal   Yakima  
Root Canal YakimaThe dreaded root canal procedure may not be as “evil” as you think it is.  Root canals are done to save a tooth, not hurt you, and Dr. Nic Reep, our Yakima area dentist, is available to safely, effectively and even painlessly administer root canal therapy to save your tooth. It is important to understand the root canal procedure to eliminate your fears and anxieties before treatment. 
 
Chances are, your concerns or worries about a root canal in Yakima were brought on by someone else’s horror story or a bad past experience. But the truth of the matter is, root canal therapy is intended to relieve the pain caused by your decayed tooth, not cause you pain. The best way to overcome your fears of a root canal, save your tooth and relieve your pain is to visit Dr. Nic Reep, a dentist in Yakima, WA who specializes in root canal therapy and offers extensive training in administering the procedure. These dental professionals are known as endodontists.  These specialists in root canals have received advanced training in delivering successful, comfortable root canals that help patients feel at ease while saving the tooth.
 

Why are Root Canals Necessary?

 
Dr. Reep may recommend root canal therapy when the inside of your tooth (the pulp which provides nutrients to the tooth) becomes infected due to injury or decay.  The pulp can get infected or inflamed for a number of reasons, including trauma or an accident, multiple fillings, or a broken down tooth. Untreated, the infection can spread into the surrounding bone, causing more serious problems. Root canal therapy removes the infection from the pulp. The only other alternative to root canal therapy is to extract the tooth.
 
A common sign of an infected tooth is pain or discomfort.  Other symptoms of infected or inflamed pulp include prolonged sensitivity to heat or cold, sensitivity to touch, discoloration of the tooth, and swelling and tenderness in the gums.
 

The Procedure - What to Expect

 
During root canal therapy, your tooth will be numbed, which means the procedure will be as comfortable and pain free as possible. Then the diseased tissue is removed and replaced with a filling material. The tooth is often “capped” with a crown to return strength and restore the tooth’s appearance.
 
Following treatment the tooth should be cared for the same as natural teeth. With regular brushing, flossing and visits to your dentist in Yakima, Dr. Nic Reep, a tooth treated with a root canal can last you the rest of your life.
 
If you experience tooth pain, it doesn’t always mean you need root canal therapy. Always talk to Dr. Nic Reep about problems you are having with your teeth. If you do need a root canal, a Dr. Reep can safely and comfortably administer treatment so that you can save your tooth and restore it to full function and appearance.

By Reep Family Dental
December 12, 2013
Category: Oral Health
PreventingEarlyChildhoodCavities

When do you think is the earliest age that tooth decay can start? Would you be surprised to learn that the answer is… just two months!

In spite of our best efforts, throughout the world tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. And the unfortunate truth is, it’s largely preventable. Tooth decay is caused by harmful bacteria living in the mouth. These bacteria produce acids as a byproduct of feeding on the sugar we consume. The acids attack the hard enamel surfaces of the teeth, eventually making the small holes we know as cavities.

For thousands of years, these bacteria have been thriving in the carbohydrate-rich environment of our mouths. Kids aren’t born with these germs — often, however, they are passed directly from caregiver to child. But there are things you can do to keep from passing the bacteria to your children. For example, don’t share toothbrushes; don’t put items in baby’s mouth after you have licked them or put them in yours; and, if you have untreated dental disease, try to avoid kissing the baby’s lips. (And for goodness sake, don’t pre-chew a baby’s food, no matter what any celebrity may suggest.)

One effective way to control tooth decay is by reducing the amount of sugar in the diet. Sodas and candy aren’t the only culprits — fruit juices are also high in sugar. And remember, it’s not just what your child eats or drinks that matters, but when they consume it. Given time, saliva will neutralize and wash away the acids that bacteria produce. But if kids are constantly taking in sugar, the saliva can’t keep up. So give those little teeth a break — limit sugar to mealtimes, and avoid sweet treats at other times of day.

What other steps can you take to stop tooth decay before it starts? It helps to identify kids who may be more susceptible to dental disease. Given the same diet with the same oral hygiene practices, some children are much more likely than others to develop tooth decay. If these high-risk kids receive preventive treatments — such as fluoride varnishes, help with diet modification, and other measures — early tooth decay can be successfully prevented, and even reversed in some cases.

If you’re concerned that dental treatment may be too scary for little ones, you should know that we put a great deal of effort into making office visits as stress-free as possible. We have plenty of tricks to keep youngsters happy — and distracted — while we take care of business. You can help too… by maintaining a positive outlook and setting a good example.

If you would like more information about cavity prevention for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Taking the Stress Out of Dentistry for Kids.”